Terence Burlij/PBS NewsHour
Politics /02 Sep 2012
09.02.12

Picking Sides in November

November’s Presidential election is coming down to the wire. And with neither candidate holding a clear and decisive lead in the polls, it is still anyone’s guess as to who will be America’s next President. In a recent Wall Street Journal editorial the argument is made, “If America were in a better place, Mr. Obama would be cruising to a second term. But most Americans have come to realize the country is in trouble and is heading for worse on its current path. Mr. Romney’s life experience makes him more than qualified for what Mr. Ryan aptly describes as a ‘turnaround.”

Obama might take offense to the argument made in the WSJ. While the American economy is still sputtering along, it’s becoming clearer with each passing day that America is on the road to a slow recovery. A slow recovery is not such a bad thing either. And in fact, a slow recovery is exactly what America needs right now. By funneling huge amounts of capital into the economy, in order to stave off a total economic meltdown, Obama’s first term will forever more be known as the big loan that staved off total financial ruin.

Whether or not the federal government was fiscally responsible to American taxpayers by loaning money hand over fist to multiple corporations that could care less about America’s lower to middle class taxpayers, we will never know.

Of course, if the Federal Reserve had stayed on the sidelines and let these big businesses fail, no one knows for certain what shape the American economy would be in today.

Today, many Americans that are still holding onto a job are in a much better place (financially) than they were pre-crisis although they do sense job insecurity. A recent report that was published in the Huffington Post tells us that most working Americans today are being paid less than they were four years ago. We are being paid less and yet we feel much better off. Of course we are better off. The price of oil and gas are nowhere near their all time highs and the price of filling up our shopping baskets has gotten easier on the wallet. Our winter heating bill allows us to better heat our homes. Many of us can even afford to take a vacation, without the cost of the flight alone forcing us to take out a loan.

Unfortunately for Mitt Romney the fixing of America has already taken place and what’s left to be done is not up to either him or Obama. Most Americans (especially those that vote) are already of the mind-set that the worst is behind them. While it’s abundantly obvious to a lot of Americans that America will never be the same again, many Americans accept the changes that are taking place and they are adapting and getting on with their lives

The daily events that occur inside Washington are a very important part of the fabric that makes this country great. But at the end of the day a country can only prosper best by the sheer will and patriotism of its people. There is nowhere better for Americans to look for inspiration than to their own failings. The world has failed and is continuing to fail around us. Europe is on the verge of self-imploding and China will never offer to the world what America always has and will continue to for a very long time to come. America is still the beacon that the world looks to for hope. Down through America’s richly storied history, great presidents have instinctively known when something needs doing and they have acted accordingly. These same great presidents have also had the common sense to know that Washington alone cannot fix all of America’s problems.

America needs good leadership right now and the November election will tell us who we have placed our trust in for the next four years. Whether it’s Obama or Romney is not what’s really important going into this election. What’s imperative for whoever is victorious is that they keep Washington out of the way (just enough) to allow the American people to make our country great once more.

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