Bend It Films
Entertainment /16 Aug 2019
08.16.19

‘Blinded by the Light’ Review

Last year we had Queen via Bohemian Rhapsody, and so far this year we’ve had Elton John with Rocketman and The Beatles with Yesterday. Thanks to writer-director Gurinder Chadha (Bend It Like Beckham), our latest musical genius to receive the cinematic treatment is The Boss…New Jersey’s own Bruce Springsteen. While Blinded by the Light is not a biopic of Bruce, it is based on the memoir (Greetings from Bury Park) of British journalist Sarfraz Manzoor, who co-wrote the script with Ms. Chadha and Paul Mayeda Berges.

Viveik Kalra stars as Javed, a Pakistani Brit living in Luton during the economic downturn of Margaret Thatcher’s run as Prime Minister. Javed faces racism and the struggles of a first-generation Pakistan family pursuing their dreams. He is a wanna-be writer who creates recession-era poems and politically-charged song lyrics for his best friend’s pop-synth band. At home, his hyper-stressed father (Kulvinder Ghir) pushes to keep his ideals on track for the family – a vision which does not allow Javed to pursue a writing career.

Javed finds a supportive teacher in Ms. Clay (Hayley Atwell), and things really change for him thanks to his energetic Sikh buddy Roops (Aaron Phagura) who introduces him to the music of Springsteen. Viveik Kalra is a relative newcomer, having only previously appeared in the TV mini-series “Next of Kin.” He shines in this role, and never more than when he conveys the near-religious experience of being touched by music for the first time. The more he listens to Springsteen, the more he relates. The music helps him find his voice as a writer, and equally importantly, his place in society.

Another relative newcomer to the big screen is the terrific Nell Williams, who plays the activist Eliza. She also happens to be the love interest for Javed, and the two are quite fun to watch together. It’s a bit of a shame that the roles weren’t expanded more for both Ms. Williams and Mr. Phagura. Dean Charles-Chapman plays Matt, Javed’s long-time musician friend, and Rob Brydon has a comical appearance as Matt’s dad – one who appreciates Springsteen as much as Javed.

The film weaves in the cultural challenges of Javed and his family, as well as some of the Pakistani traditions and the accompanying pressures. Filmmaker Chadha doesn’t deliver a musical per se, but there are definitely some musical moments, including full production numbers that have us singing along. A few too many Jewish Springsteen jokes are included, and some may find the film a bit too light-hearted, but it’s crafted for mass appeal while blasting some classics from the theatre speakers: “Promised Land,” “Badlands,” “Thunder Road,” “Darkness on the Edge of Town,” “Born to Run,” “Because the Night,” “Prove it All Night,” and yes, even “Hungry Heart.” These songs are the inspiration for the movie, just as they were for Mr. Manzoor. Sure, there are some silly moments, but mostly it’s an entertaining and inspirational message movie wrapped in BRUUUUUCE!

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